Staff and Graduate Members

Asst. Prof. Patompong Johns Saengwilai, Ph.D (Aj Khwan)

Director of Bioresources and Environmental Biology (International) Programme

Vice Chair, Department of Biology

EDUCATION

Ph.D. Plant biology, The Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA

B.S. in Biology (Hons), Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

HONORS & AWARDS

** Outstanding Teacher Award 2021, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University

** Outstanding Alumni Award 2018, Nawaminthrachinuthit Bodindecha School, Bangkok, Thailand

** Outstanding Academic Staff Award 2017, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University

Office: B414 (Payathai Campus) and SC2-306 (Salaya Campus)

Email: patompong.sae@mahidol.edu

Ph.D Student

              Jirawat  Salungyu
                         (March)

Climate change is a major constraint to the crops production. Billions of people around the world are starving because of drought effects. Drought, a result of climate change, has been affecting agricultural areas in many countries worldwide including African countries  and some part of Thailand. Therefore in Thailand, farmers are facing water limitation and most of them cannot access to irrigation systems. My research is focused on phenotypic variation of root architectural traits of maize especially in the Drought tolerant maize for Africa Project and Thai maize lines under drought. However to mitigate abiotic stresses, single root trait cannot be attained the tolerance abilities. Hence, I am also working with root traits interaction in order to increase water use efficiency and nutrient acquisition in maize under stress conditions. These finding in root traits might be selection criteria for maize breeding program, and benefit world population in the future.

           Jitrana  Kengkanna
                     (Mangpor)

To survive in the competitive market and world economics, agricultural improvement is necessary for our developing community. Several methods were introduced to improve plant root traits such as genetic engineering, plant breeding and chemical application, however, these take time and may not be affordable. Here we focus on using plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) to modify root traits of maize, rice, tobacco and other economic plants. This method could be an alternative to improve plant roots, the important part of all plants.

Masters Degree Student

            Suparad  Klinsawang
                             (Ui)

During the past decade, many researchers reported that variation of root anatomical traits are associated with adaptation under drought. For improving tolerant rice varietiy, DNA markers could be used to assist in the breeding program. Therefore, I’m working on quantitative trait loci analysis of root anatomical traits of rice (Oryza sativa) under well-watered and drought conditions. I aim to identify DNA markers associated with variation in rice root anatomical traits and compare QTL(s) under well-watered and drought condition.

       Sorathan Jaruwatee
                   (Pleam)

I study the agronomical and root traits of Khao Dok Ma Li 105 mutant rice (Oryza sativa)by using the mesocosm system. KDML105 was used in this research because it is the one of the well-known and high-value commercial rice cultivars of the world. However it has some traits that affected to yield loss such as sensitivity to drought stress. Selection and evaluation of traits among mutants will help identify new tools for plant breeding and crop selection for drought tolerance.

          Pitchapa  Nimwatanakul
                       (Maprang)

To survive in the competitive market and world economics, agricultural improvement is necessary for our developing community. Several methods were introduced to improve plant root traits such as genetic engineering, plant breeding and chemical application, however, these take time and may not be affordable. Here we focus on using plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) to modify root traits of maize, rice, tobacco and other economic plants. This method could be an alternative to improve plant roots, the important part of all plants.

  William Alexander Lavoy
                       (Will)

My research focuses on mycorrhiza and rice. The need to grow rice in more water efficient conditions opens new doors for rice to interact with microbes in the soil. Since mycorrhiza are aerobic organisms, rice grown in non-flooded conditions should theoretically be able to benefit from them. The goals of my research are to identify the effects mycorrhiza have on rice root traits, as well if this leads to improved fitness for rice varieties that struggle in drier environments. I hope my research will be able to benefit farmers that have limited selection in rice varieties or access to water (rain or irrigated).

Research Assistant

Chonchanok Saengatitutai
(Cat)

Sirin Sirirakphaisarn
(Sirin)